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 Natural History Images

     These images reveal variation and change in nature.  The diversity of plant and animal life is the result of a history of variation and change.  These images are merely a "snapshot" of a brief moment in time near the very end of a more than three billion year history of evolution of life on Earth.  Evolution primarily by natural selection has produced these marvelous adaptations of living organisms to their environment by a materialistic, mechanistic process without purpose or directed goals toward a specific endpoint.  The process of natural selection discovered by Charles Darwin over 150 years ago is one of the greatest discoveries of all time by science. This is the nature of nature and I find it uplifting and remarkable.  The human mind (an emergent property from a large complex brain) is also a product of this process, but it has the capacity for purpose and goals, and an ethics for nature.  We are a part of nature and ultimately dependent on nature for our quality of life on Earth.  Preservation and helping in the recovery of wilderness (the least human disturbed natural areas) are essential in saving what's left of our rapidly disappearing biodiversity of evolved organisms.  My moral sense is that it is wrong for us to cause the extinction of species and subspecies of life.  We must coexist with all the plants, animals, and microbes with which we share the Earth.  My hope is that these natural history images will help show that people are going to have to take responsibility for doing the morally right thing in our stewardship of nature. Come with me and see the images of what's left of the natural places in our unnatural world, and celebrate all life on Earth and marvel at how it evolved to be here.
     Every natural history image in this website tells a story.  The pop-ups for each photo are write-ups based on documentation in the References Section, the Internet, and my observations in the field.  Some of the images are given special consideration for my comments about the nature of natural selection as a major process in producing the extraordinary adaptations of organisms, and the evolution of the immense array of life's diversity on Earth.
     Comments on the nature of natural selection are in:  FISHES, #57-10. Creek Chub, #57-29. Two Orangethroat Darters, #57-31. Plains Killifish, #57-35. Cutthroat Trout (male),  #57-37. Goldfish; AMPHIBIANS, #20-50 and #20-51. Cricket Frogs, #20-60. Wood Frog, #20-61. Gray Tree Frog, #20-63 and #20-64. Great Basin Spadefoot, and #20-69. Woodhouse's Toad; REPTILES, #18-11. Rubber Boa, #18-13. Northern Water Snake, #18-17. Gopher Snake, #18-18. Prairie Kingsnake, #18-50. Northern Earless Lizard, #18-57. Leopard Lizard,  #19-14. Yellow Mud Turtle; BIRDS, #10-01. Common Loon, #10-18, #10-19, #10-192, and #10-193. Snow Geese, #10-20. Mallard, #10-30. Killdeer (mating), #10-33. Wilson's Phalarope, #10-41. American Woodcock, #20-07. Sharp-shined Hawk, #20-10. Osprey, #20-19, Sage Grouse (chick), #20-20. Greater Prairie Chicken, #20-31. Great Horned Owl, #10-44. Downy Woodpecker, #10-49. Lewis' Woodpecker, #11-13. Western Meadowlark, #10-53. Eastern Kingbird, #10-59. Gray Jay, #10-61 Black-capped Chickadee, #10-67. Rock Wren, #10-81. Cedar Waxwing, #11-17. Baltimore Oriole; MAMMALS, #17-20. Hoary Bat, #17-42. Pika, #16-61. Gray Wolf, #15-10. Pronghorns, #15-31. Bighorn Sheep, #15-32. Wild Horse, #15-33. Wild Burros, #15-34. Wild Pig, #15-62. Beaver,  #15-63. Striped Skunk; FUNGI, #48-81. Common Stinkhorn; TREES, #26-11. Aspen Tree Trunks, #26-14. Big sagebrush, #26-18. Redbud Tree blossoms; ROCKS, #56-04. Granite, and; MISC., #52-21. Geometrid Moth Larva; BUTTERFLIES, #44-2. Western Tiger Swallowtail, and #44-3. Anise Swallowtail. 
 

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